How to make friends in a new world, in a time of change

A new generation of Jewish friends is making friends across the world, with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s election as U.S. president a prominent symbol.

Netanyahu, 65, won the election on Nov. 4, but a few months later he became the first Israeli leader in decades to be impeached.

In a year of historic political upheaval, he has become an unlikely icon for the Jewish community.

“It was not a coincidence that he got into the White House,” said Dov Lior, president of the Israel Democracy Institute, a nonprofit that tracks Israeli politics.

“The fact that he was elected is a reflection of a shift in the political climate in the United States, and that shift is a result of a massive backlash against the policies and politics of President Trump.”

Netanyahu has had a tough time finding new friends in his new administration.

While he’s had several high-profile meetings with U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who has been a longtime supporter of Israel, there has been little communication between him and U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May.

He’s had a hard time meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, whom he’s been accused of meddling in the 2016 U.R.S., which has come under U.s. investigation for potential interference in the U.P. election.

The Trump administration has also been hit hard by the wave of anti-Semitism that swept Europe following the election of a Muslim U.B.C. politician, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, to the U-B.E. parliament in Belgium.

Netanyahu has criticized her speech, and has tried to use the UBC speech as an excuse to cut a deal with the UBS bank over the company’s financing for the Balfour Declaration, a historic declaration of the Jewish people to conquer the land of Israel.

On top of that, there’s the fact that the U,S.

is currently embroiled in a major investigation into whether it violated the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The Trump administration is considering revoking the Obama-era Trade Promotion Authority, which gave Congress the power to approve or reject trade deals, and also is considering lifting the embargo on Russia, a key ally.

Netanyahus first encounter with the president happened in the Oval Office, when the Israeli prime minister was delivering a speech to a joint session of Congress about the Urdan Idris nuclear deal with Iran.

Netanayahu was introduced by a U.A.E.-born lawmaker named Yair Lapid, who was an Israeli-American congressman who served in Congress from 1985 to 1993 and is now Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations.

The two spoke for about two minutes before Netanyahu asked Lapid to take the microphone and give his opening remarks.

Lapid introduced Netanyahu to an American delegation that included former Vice President Joe Biden and Rep. David Cicilline, a Democrat from Rhode Island.

“We were all a little surprised that a president would come in, meet with me and then come out with a speech,” Lapid said.

“I was not surprised.

I had never heard anything like it before.”

After Lapid’s speech, Netanyahu thanked the UA.e delegation for their efforts.

“It was a wonderful introduction,” Netanyahu said.

But the visit quickly turned sour when the Israelis learned that the president had met with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin, who had been meeting with UBS.

In an apparent effort to curry favor with Rivlin’s administration, the Israeli president reportedly met with a group of U.BS executives.

NetANYAHUS’ HISTORYWith the election, Netanyahu was left with a new problem.

The U. S. was already on a mission to dismantle the UPA, which had governed since 1967.

The goal was to remove a number of anti–U.S.-Israeli laws, including one that limited U.’s access to U. Bank accounts and the other that restricted U. s use of the UCR.

Netahus was appointed by President Obama in 2012, to serve as the countrys ambassador to Israel, which was given to Biden.

He became a staunch supporter of the president’s policies, and was later tapped as ambassador to India by Biden.

In his time as ambassador, Netanyahu has met with the Indian prime minister, as well as several other top Indian officials, and he has also met with President Pranab Mukherjee, the Indian president.

“Netanyahu was never the kind of person to get angry with people.

He was always very respectful, and it’s hard to imagine him ever making a comment about something he disagreed with,” said former U.D.C.-based journalist Robert Parry.

Netal was also an early supporter of Palestinian rights, and in 2014, the United Nation voted to recognize the Palestinian

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