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Make better friends make better presidents, but that’s not a new thought.

After all, it’s why President Barack Obama was able to make friends with his Republican opponents during the 2016 presidential campaign and why former President George W. Bush was able during the height of the Iraq war to forge strong relationships with his adversaries.

But what’s often forgotten is that Obama, Bush, and Clinton were all able to do so thanks to their ability to connect through the internet, especially Facebook.

When Obama launched his first Facebook page in 2008, he quickly gained a following.

It was an effective way to reach a global audience and connect with people outside of his hometown.

As a result, Obama had an almost unprecedented ability to tap into the country’s vast network of connected people to garner a national audience.

“Facebook had not yet evolved to become the platform for a democracy, so it was not the same platform that Americans had used to connect with their friends and neighbors,” said Dan Gertner, co-author of “The Social Media Revolution,” a book about the social network.

Even in his most successful years, Obama was successful in tapping into the US’ enormous internet network, which has helped the president achieve his lofty goals of creating jobs, increasing economic opportunity, and helping the country rebuild.

“His political success came from the internet.

He had people around him and in his circle of trust, which meant he had a global reach,” said Mark Krikorian, a former Obama administration aide and now a professor at Northeastern University.”

It was incredibly helpful to him because it allowed him to do a lot of the things that he needed to do.”

But that reach is not unlimited.

In the 2016 election, Obama’s presidential campaign was targeted by Russian hackers, who had gained access to the emails of his campaign manager, John Podesta, who was a close confidant of then-candidate Hillary Clinton.

It was a massive breach that left the campaign, including Podesta’s email account, in a state of disarray.

Obama ultimately managed to get a second-round debate in the Democratic primary, but he suffered a massive backlash in the polls, and his campaign was ultimately forced to concede.

The Trump campaign was similarly targeted by the Russian government in an attempt to undermine the candidacy of Trump.

Trump had a very different strategy, which he utilized extensively.

Trump has never been a politician who wants to be popular, he has never really been popular himself, and he has been the subject of a tremendous amount of criticism for his comments and actions.

But his success on social media is a far cry from Clinton’s, who famously struggled to connect to the American public, including her husband.

“Clinton’s ability to engage the American people on social is more impressive than anyone else I’ve ever seen in my lifetime,” said Adam Hodge, an author and political commentator.

“I’ve seen some people who are really successful, who have a ton of followers, but Hillary Clinton didn’t have that.”

Indeed, Clinton struggled to gain a significant following during her 2008 presidential campaign.

According to Hodge and other observers, Clinton’s ability was largely due to the fact that her campaign was so successful that her opponents had trouble even attempting to reach her.

She didn’t even seem to have an effective messaging campaign, which ultimately led to her defeat.

Hodge said Clinton’s inability to reach out to a wide swath of voters was a key factor in her loss in 2016.

“There are a number of reasons why she didn’t get the support that she needed to win, but I think it was largely the lack of engagement on social,” Hodge said.

A closer look at Clinton’s successes on social, however, is revealing a much different story.

In fact, Clinton is far from alone in having a difficult time reaching the American electorate.

While Obama and his predecessors enjoyed a great amount of success on the internet thanks to Facebook, it is far less common for a presidential candidate to have such a difficult online presence.

A study released by Harvard University last year showed that of the candidates running for the U: Clinton, Obama, and Biden, Clinton only received 6.4 percent of their online followers on Facebook.

A total of just 10.5 percent of the American population is connected to the internet at any given time.

Despite that, the president is able to tap those people’s Facebook accounts to gain an audience.

It is no secret that Obama has a great social media following, especially among the youth demographic.

In the summer of 2016, Facebook was already trending in America’s youth demographic, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was trying to reach the youth by creating a new Facebook app called Connect.

Connect was an effort to connect teenagers with each other through the use of video chats.

But Zuckerberg, who has been credited with turning the internet into a powerful tool for social activism, did not anticipate the political

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